Fairy tales of russian writers. Contents. Free games.


 

A collection Fairy tales from Russia.
Sergei Aksakov: The little scarlet flower.

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Then her father spoke thus,  "What is it, my dear darling daughter? Why do you not take the flower you so desired? There is none finer in the whole wide world."
The youngest daughter took the Little Scarlet Flower, reluctantly it seemed, kissed her father's hands and shed burning tears of sorrow. By and by, the elder daughters hurried in, still rapturous with delight, having tried out their father's presents. Then everyone took his place at oaken tables covered with white embroidered tablecloths, laden with choice sweetmeats and meads; and they all set to eating and drinking, refreshing themselves and comforting their father with soothing speeches.
Towards evening, guests began to arrive and the merchant's house was soon filled with good friends and kinsfolk and lovers of good cheer. Till midnight the company sat and talked, and never had the honest merchant seen so grand an evening of feasting in his home;
and he, like all the company, marvelled whence everything had come-the gold and silver dishes and the fantastic viands such as had never graced his house before.
In the morning, the merchant summoned his eldest daughter, recounted all his adventures, from beginning to end, and asked her would she save him from a terrible death by going to live with the Beast of the Forest, Denizen of the Deep. But the eldest daughter refused outright, saying,
"Let it be that daughter who desired the Little Scarlet Flower-let her go and save her father."
So the honest merchant summoned his second daughter, told her all that had befallen him, from beginning to end, and asked her would she save him from a terrible death by going to live with the Beast of the Forest, Denizen of the Deep. But the second daughter refused outright, saying,
"Let it be that daughter who desired the Little Scarlet Flower-let her go and save her father."
Then the honest merchant summoned Ms youngest daughter and began telling his story, from beginning to end; yet even before he had time to finish, the beloved youngest daughter fell upon her knees before him and said,
"Give me your blessing. Sire, my dear father. I will go to the Beast of the Forest, Denizen of the Deep, and live with him. It was for me you fetched the Little Scarlet Flower and it is my duty to rescue you."
Tears filled the honest merchant's eyes as he embraced Ms be-loved youngest daughter, and he spoke these words to her, "0 my dear, good, kind daughter, youngest and fondest, may a father's blessing be upon you for saving your father from a cruel death and for going of your own free will and desire to live with the awesome Beast of the Forest, Denizen of the Deep, You will live in his palace, in great splendour and ease; but where that palace is, no one knows and no one can tell, for there is no way to it by horse or foot-not even for bounding beast or swift-flying bird. We shall hear no word or news of you, nor you of us. I know not how I will live out my days of anguish, never seeing your sweet face, nor hearing your tender words... I part with you for ever and ever, as if I were burying you alive in the earth."

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